CLAUDIO FERNANDO RAMIREZ LAGOS TESSELLATION ART GALLERY



Chilean Tessellation artist claudio ramirez fernando lagos
colorful cartoony Escher-style cat and fish tessellation

Claudio Fernando Ramirez Lagos of Chile is probably still almost unknown in the English speaking tessellation art community. Let's change that. Although communicating with him was hard-- he speaks little English; I speak little Spanish-- his art "speaks" for him. His tessellations have a fresh, colorful, playful, cartoony style that reminds me of nobody else's work. The patterns are complicated and hard to see at first, but anybody can easily see the obvious joy in his art.

Of Mr. Ramirez's beginnings in tessellation, he says

"I discovered [...] tessellation when was a boy: In a T.V. program, [...] the man on TV put many "Chinese Boys" (Escher, "China Boy", 1936) [...] in a table. [Later,] I see an article in a newspaper [showing] "Fishes and Birds" (Escher, Sky & Water I, 1938), and one called "Horsemen" (Escher, Horsemen, 1946). Finally, when I was 30, I see in [an]other Chilean city a little cardboard book, with many [tessellations], but I can't see them all, because I can't buy [the book]. [Later], with the arrival of the Internet, I could know the rest of Escher's Work. Then I tried to make [...] tessellations by myself. Finally, I discovered the site Tessellations.org; that is my story."

We are working on translating from Spanish to English Mr. Ramirez's notes on his tessellation method; then we hope to present it as a lesson plan for you here on Tessellations.org.












Click on any sample, above, to see a large full picture of it.

Claudio Fernando Ramírez Lagos was born in 1968, September the 12th. He is 43. He writes that these drawings were designed several years ago. In some of them such as the blue cats, he writes, he got his niece's help. He tells us that he remembers the long winter nights when he was busy with these.

He goes on to say that he designs his art in a mathematics copybook, then copies the art onto tracing paper. Next he Xeroxes it, and lastly colors the art using crayons. The copies you see here went through one more step: they were computer scanned and emailed from Chile to Thailand.